ARC Envy and How to Deal with It // Thursday Ramblings

THURSDAY RAMBLINGS IS A CASUAL FEATURE/MEME HERE ON JOSIE’S BOOK CORNER WHERE I PICK A TOPIC AND DISCUSS IT WITH YOU. THIS IS A CASUAL POST, FILLED WITH RAMBLING AND CHATTING! SO BASICALLY, WE ARE SIMPLY HAVING A CONVERSATION ABOUT THE TOPIC AT HAND!

Hello bookworms, and welcome back to Josie’s Book Corner! It’s another lovely Thursday and this is my first bookish discussion of 2016. For this week’s topic, I want to start the year off by discussing ARC envy. As a book blogger who has now blogged for almost a year (technically a year if you count by months rather than days), I have been around long enough to see displays of ARC envy and hear experiences of ARC envy. It’s a pretty toxic thing, and I wanted to start off the year letting you all know – whether you’re an older, more experienced blogger or a newbie book blogger – about it and how you can avoid or deal with it. 


What is ARC envy?

First off all, we have to establish what an ARC is – it’s an Advanced Reader’s Copy, which is essentially, a book that is given to certain people in advance of being published. People receive ARCS to give honest reviews and feedback of a book before it gets published, to (hopefully) build hype around it. Bloggers, Booktubers and such can request for ARCS, and this can be done in many ways – contacting publishers by email, using sites such as Netgalley that provide ARCS for people, contacting authors through Twitter, etc. 

This is where ARC envy comes in. Not everyone gets ARCs. Only a select few people get them – and usually it’s those who are active, possibly more well known, or something of the sort. And for many of us bloggers, it causes us to be very envious, especially when we are NOT on the receiving end. Some of us feel a little bitter when out requests get rejected, some of us get angry, some of us get really sad, and some of us get really desperate for them. 

Why do we even HAVE ARC envy?

Personally, I’ve never had ARC envy in the entire year that I’ve been blogging. Upon starting my book blog, I never even knew such a thing existed, until someone started mentioning Netgalley in one of their posts. I even had to Google what an ARC was (oh I was such a noob back then).

I’ve heard so many stories involving ARC envy. Some book lovers start blogs only for the purpose of receiving ARCs. Many people misuse the concept of the ARC and in my opinion, I think the envy surrounding them can stem from a wrong perspective of what ARCs really are for. I think that it’s those people who want ARCs so they don’t have to pay for the book themselves. 

But of course, this is not the case for all of us bloggers – some of us just don’t understand why we can’t be granted an ARC when another of our blogger friends gets to receive ARCs. I will admit, sometimes I gawk a little at how some people I know, are constantly receiving ARCs. The majority of these people I am thinking about are Booktubers. I feel as though they get quite a lot of ARCs. But in saying that, I know many bloggers who get ARCs quite regularly, while I struggle to get my requests accepted. However, I’ve never taken these observations to heart, and the closest I’ve ever come to ARC envy is feeling slightly disappointed that I didn’t get accepted for that certain book I wanted to read in advance. 

ARC envy is not okay. It makes bloggers lose focus on why they are blogging and can sometimes cause drama. It’s unnecessary. So, I’m going to discuss with you some of the ways I keep myself from experiencing ARC envy:

1. Ask yourself why you want that particular ARC

An ARC is not available so that you can get a book for free to read. Going in and requesting ARCs with an intention like this is definitely not the way to go – this is manipulating and taking advantage of publishers to freely allow people to not only read a book at no cost, but also BEFORE the release date.

ARCs are available so that they can get critical and effective feedback that will help with the sale of the book when it is finally released. If you go to request a book just because you’ve heard that it’s a good book and you want to read it, but you don’t want to pay for it, you have no reason to get upset if you are declined access to it.

2. Publishers have a certain limit/are careful about who and how many ARCs they give out – there’s a reason for that

None of us should get upset if our requests are declined, because there’s a reason for this. Publishers have to be careful how many ARCs they give out and they must be selective about who they give them to. Are you envious of that one popular Booktuber or book blogger who seems to get ARCs of the exciting books? There’s a reason for that: they’re popular, so they have a wide audience so publishers know that the book will reach the eyes of many. Most likely, this booktuber/blogger has a history of good book reviews. If you’ve ever been on Netgalley, you know some of the requirements that you need to have to receive ARCs.

Publishers need to be careful, because as I mentioned in my last point, there definitely are those out there who will only request ARCs so that they don’t have to pay for the book themselves. It’s good to keep this in mind before letting your envy take over. 

3. It really isn’t the end of the world if you don’t get the book early

So you’re sure you don’t want the book just for the fact that it’s free? Because usually, it’s these people who would get upset that they didn’t receive an ARC. Something we always need to remind ourselves is that, what harm is it going to do if we don’t receive the book a month/ a few weeks before it’s ACTUAL release date? There are millions more book lovers out there simply waiting for the book to be released – you can read it with the rest of them! Sometimes the wait is fun… but then again, waiting for a sequel or a next book in a series is definitely a tough thing to do! 


That is it for this week’s Thursday Ramblings! I hope you all enjoyed. For all of you newbie bloggers, this is a must read and I hope it helps out in your book blogging journey. Or for any book blogger for that matter! 

Have you experienced ARC envy? If so, how do you deal with it?

62 thoughts on “ARC Envy and How to Deal with It // Thursday Ramblings

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  5. Wonderful post Josie, you’ve definitely covered the reasons why hoarding ARCs isn’t a good thing to do! You do have to read them and not getting a free book isn’t the end of the world because you’ll be able to buy it when it’s released. I’ve got a formula with ARCs, if it’s not something I was interested in reading upon release, then don’t request it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Jeann! That’s exactly right. I never request an ARC unless I am 100% interested in it and it’s something I want to share my thoughts with to everyone. But other than that, I am happy with buying my own copy once it’s released.

      Like

  6. ohhh, the ARC envy… I will make a slight distinction here about physical ARCs and eARCs, ok? Being an international blogger, from a non-english country, it sucks that it’s a million times harder (if not impossible) to get a physical ARC, so I’ll admit to being jealous about that, but not because I wouldn’t spend the money on the book, just because I would like to read and hold the book in my hands months prior to its release. But I can deal with that!
    About eARCs, I’m a huge fan of Netgalley! I use edelweiss too, but I don’t like that system as much. I love to receive eARCs because I love reviewing books before they’re even out. And more importantly, I get to read books that I usually wouldn’t even pick up in a bookstore and it opened my eyes to some wonderful stuff out there. Though I like Netgalley’s system better, it is by no means perfect, and it is frustrating at times to be denied for a book and seeing a fellow blogger being accepted. – the problem isn’t with the other blogger, obviously!
    Overall, I’m just thankful that ARCs even exist, because I didn’t know they did until like 6 months ago. And we should never let our jealousy and sadness over not getting an ARC transform into envy.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. So maybe I’m in a complete hole in the ground buuuut…I’ve never seen anyone freak out over ARC envy in a nasty way online! I’ve heard disappointment, and I think that’s 100% fair. *nods* Because sometimes bloggers don’t have the money to buy books? So if they don’t get an ARC they don’t get to read the book, and that’s really disappointing. And I understand it so well as a not-much-money-to-spend blogger myself. In fact, when I started blogging I NEVER EVER bought books (unless they were old ones that were like $1 or $2 from op-shops) So ARCs was a way for me to read new things and it was uber exciting. I’m not saying I’m into ARCs for the free books…but I don’t think it’s horrible to want them because you can’t afford it any other way? If that makes sense. XD BUT YEAH.

    Also it’s not good to make others feel bad for getting an ARC! Like I’ve heard of bloggers who’ve quit doing hauls and things because they’ve gotten flack for “flaunting” their ARCs, when in reality they were just advertising the book because they needed to! Like that’s part of getting an ARC right?!? So yeah. It is a mixed bag. xD

    Grand discussion! I really enjoyed this. 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    • I totally understand what you’re saying Cait! The disappointment of not getting an ARC is reasonable indeed. I’m also a blogger who doesn’t have much money to spend on books (I don’t even have a job at the moment, eek!) and it helps to get ARCs to read them, I understand that. And if I do get an ARC, I always write a review and do what is intended of an ARC.
      It truly is a mixed bag! Thank you for your comment Cait, I’m glad you enjoyed the discussion. 😀

      Like

  8. this post is wonderful! and also appropriate since i recently got a message from a blogger friend who was receiving some hate/ARC envy from others. i think people are making a way too big deal out of it – the book is going to be released eventually and you can wait a bit longer. it’s really not the end of the world. i wish this wasn’t a problem in the book blogging/booktubing world, but it is :// loooooove this discussion!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Alexandra! Oh my, send my love to your blogger friend for me. That’s horrible that she is receiving that kind of stuff, it’s so unnecessary.
      It shouldn’t be a problem, and I’m sad that it is quite a problem in this community.

      I’m glad you enjoyed the discussion. 😀

      Like

  9. In a perfect world, everyone would buy the book upon release. Unfortunately, that’s far from true.

    I think the main takeaway from most ARC discussions is that you don’t have to review ARCs to be happy or find success within the community. Sure they’re tokens of accomplishments (especially the physical copies) but I’d argue that getting e-galleys are actually quite easy to be accepted for (they just might not be for books you’d want LOL). Either way, ARC envy is surely some rite of passage that most will go through and it’s a natural human response. So I can’t really fault that.

    Liked by 2 people

    • ARC envy is indeed natural, but I find it sad when people take out their envy on other people and turn it into attacks on those who get a fair amount of ARCs on a regular basis, you know?
      I will admit, there have been one or two ARCs I read but never bought the physical copy. There is one I still intend to buy actually.

      Like

  10. Great post! When I first started blogging I felt this urge to request all the ARCs on NetGalley even for books I’d never heard of and wasn’t sure if I’d even get a chance to read just for the sake of it… Toward the second half of the year though I had so many unread ARCs that I felt really bad for requesting and not reading, possibly taking away the chance for someone else more interested to receive the ARC. Since then I’ve decided to only request ARCs that I really really want to read and that I’ll know I’ll be able to read and review right away. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Gabby. Oh my goodness, yes I’ve experienced that before! I think we all go a little crazy with it when we first discover it.
      It’s really important to only request for the ARCs you are most interested in. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Girl, I’m nodding my head yes to every point here. Love your thoughts here, Josie!

    I’ve experienced ARC envy myself and this post just reminded me why I shouldn’t. After all, we get to read them eventually when it’s released, yeah? Also, I liked how you pointed out that we shouldn’t request an ARC just because it’s free. Our intentions should be more than that. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Trisha!
      ARCs are such a small part of the reading and blogging community, all the fuss over them sometimes is crazy.
      Indeed, our intentions must definitely be more than that! We must always keep in mind the intentions publishers have for giving out ARCs when we think of our OWN intentions. 🙂

      Like

  12. Before I say anything I do have to admit that due to my bookstore reviewing gig I get to read a lot of very coveted ARCs all the time, so that has maybe normalized everything for me, but I really don’t get envious of ARCs at all. The ARCs I do read are simply books I’m excited to read, and I would be just excited to read them when they are actually released. So, I’m not really envious of ARCs because those are just books I’ll read eventually, and in the mean time I already have SO MANY books to read!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh yes, for your job I suppose it’s normal! It’s true, they are just books that you will read eventually, that’s why ARC envy is quite ridiculous to me, or should I say, it’s just not something I understand. And like you said, there are SO many books out there that we need to read – just take a look at some of our Goodreads TBRs!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. A great discussion post!
    I do not get ARC envy actually, I normally just envy the amount of books people have that I want to read! I understand that people don’t just get given ARCs and if you want then that badly you will need to work for them!
    I am on NetGalley now but I’m not really asking for any ARCs because I have enough books to read on my shelves. I think us readers get a bit greedy and think we are entitled to anything and everything the publishers let out. We are not and should learn to be patient. Great post again 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, I have been known to get a tiny bit envious of those who attain to many books, especially the ones I want to read badly. But I’ve kind of accepted the fact that I’ll be quite behind on books all the time.
      I haven’t requested an ARC since probably September last year! It’s true, we can get a bit greedy, and we need to learn to just tone it down a little. Publishers work hard to bring us these books after all!

      Like

  14. I wish I could buy every book I read. I honestly do, and I feel guilty for even borrowing books from the library. For all the joy that books bring me, I want to compensate writers for all the hard, hard work that goes into writing them.

    As for the book blogging world, sometimes it seems as if that’s some great pantheon of gods. There are demi-god, half mortal, and mortal book bloggers like me. Then there are mega, superstar book bloggers who are like gods on Mount Olympus, with publishers bringing them offerings of ARCs, author interviews, etc.

    I can’t say whether or not it’s fair; it just is.

    However, I do find it ironic that, if passionate book readers are working the system to obtain free books, they’re grievously harming the very mechanism that provides them with books in the first place. Writers must earn a living; they must be compensated for writing books so they can afford to keep writing them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Indeed! More than anything, I love to buy books – it’s just, the money thing becomes a problem.
      Yes, there is a certain hierarchy in the book blogging world, but I think it all depends on our efforts. What we do will determine how popular or how high up we are. That’s how I see it anyway. Rewards for hard work.
      Exactly! Writers are working to live through their books, and we should all take that into account too. I totally forgot about that point on this post.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Great Post Josie! I’ve gone through ARC envy for quite sometime but now I don’t care much about it because I have a huge TBR list that I need to complete and I’ve got no time to review ARC’s. I definitely hate those deadlines BTW.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. This is so true Josie! I myself don’t request ARCs much often because I’m afraid I won’t have all the time to read them OR I might not like the book that much to the point that I have to pressure myself into finishing it. AND sometimes I’m not into that “reviewer” side of me, my brain just doesn’t cooperate with me sometimes 😜 Nevertheless, what a wonderful topic you have brought out! Thanks for this

    Liked by 1 person

    • One of the reasons I don’t request ARCS is because I’m afraid I won’t finish them in time too!
      Oh I know how you feel, sometimes when I come to review a book, my mind goes blank and I sit there cursing myself for it 😂
      I’m glad you liked the topic! Thank you for taking the time to read it.

      Like

  17. I try so hard not to let ARC envy affect me. Not only is it a drain, it also takes away some of the fun of blogging. I’m not afraid to admit when I feel it, like right now – I have a serious case of ARC envy because there are a lot of people with Glass Sword ARCs and I’m over here going full Gollum on my precious babies.

    The fact that some people start blogging just to get free ARCs so they don’t have to pay for the book makes me want to both vomit and shudder in horror. ARCs are a privilege that you have to earn through hard work and gaining a following, and networking, not something you deserve simply because you want it. The only reason I had the ARCS I did was because I convinced my parents to let me go to ALA this past summer as a birthday gift.

    I love ARCs, don’t get me wrong, I just feel as though they are sort of the special gold flake sprinkles on top of a cake made up of many wonderful layers. There is so much more to blogging than free stuff. I’d rather share my love of an old favorite and bring more people into a fandom I adore than strangle myself with the pressure ARCs bring any day.

    Great discussion post, by the way! I love your discussion posts, they’re my favorite. ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m on the other side of the spectrum than you – ARC envy never affects me! But I must admit, seeing lots of people holding ARCs of something we are anticipating such as Glass Sword can make my hands twitch a little.
      Yes, ARCs are a complete and utter privilege! And there’s so much more to it than a ‘free book’. They’re meant to be reviewed and reviewed well, and there’s limits to the amount of people and more! It also takes dedication to keep up with ARCs and I personally don’t think I’m ready for that as a blogger.
      I’m on the same boat as you – old favourites any day!
      Aw thank you, you’re so kind ☺️💕

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re very welcome 💞

        I think it really depends on the ARC when it comes to me feeling envy or not. There are some I could care less about and then some I really really want but I know I’m going to buy the book anyway when it comes out.

        I love reviewing arcs, in all honesty I really do. But, the pressure to review them is really stressful once you’ve got them. I always feel bad if my review doesn’t come up until after publication, but I really just don’t have the time for it while in school.

        Keep up the awesome discussion posts, they make me so happy XD

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yep, that’s true. I remember when people for ARCs of A Court of Thorns and Roses and I thought to myself: I WANT ONE TOO.
        But the pressure, oh the pressure. I don’t like it one bit! Especially in those busy school seasons.
        Thank you! Seriously I am so glad you like them! ☺️

        Liked by 1 person

  18. I can understand why some people get ARC envy and I don’t blame them for that. However, what I don’t like is how some may take out their disappointment and frustration on those who are fortunate to receive ARC’s. ARCs are essentially marketing tools and so a publisher is more likely to send copies out to blogs/booktubers that can generate excitement for the book.

    Personally I’m not to bothered by ARCs. I barely use NetGalley and I find that I have enough books in my to be read pile that I can read through. Also I am a mood reader so I can never dictate when I’ll want to read a book which can frustrate me if I have a deadline to meet.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s so horrible when that envy and anger is taken out on those who receive ARCs. Most of these people worked hard or are deserving of those ARCs – maybe not all, but most.
      And yes, in the end it’s all just a marketing scheme!
      Oh the struggles of being a mood reader! Sometimes I do find it hard to stick to those deadlines too.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Yes. Yes. Yes. You have hit the nail on the head here. While it is thrilling to receive a coveted ARC, it is an honour and not a right. I am just starting to take a new approach to my ARC requests. I am actually finding that having ARCs to review leaves less time for backlist titles. I really want to add more backlist books to my blog reviews. Thanks for your amazing insights!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank goodness, that was my goal!
      ARCs are an honour, yes, and I am very appreciative when I receive one, and they should be treated as such.
      I’m a reader of backlist titles mainly at the moment, so that’s why I am not even trying to get ARCS right now! I know what you mean.
      You’re welcome, I’m glad you enjoyed it! 😊

      Like

  20. Great discussion topic! I have the occasional moments of ARC envy but that is usually when I see people get multiple copies of the same ARC.
    On a separate note, it is totally wrong for people to request ARCs just so they don’t have to pay for the book. When I read an ARC and I end up liking or loving it, I always make the decision to buy the finished copy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you!
      Seeing people get multiple ARC copies surprises me, I remember when I just found our about them, I saw book tubers with more than one ARC copy and I was surprised and a little confused. And I totally wanted one, haha.
      Yes, that’s exactly the same with me! If I’ve been given an ARC that I thoroughly enjoyed, I always make a note to purchase it. That reminds me.. There’s still one I must purchase!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. When I first found out about ARCs I was actually very obsessed with figuring out how to get my hands on these things..and then after a ridiculous amount of ARC requests accepted (even though my blog was still a baby), I realized that I’m being irrational. 😛 Since being overwhelmed with a bunch of e-ARCs, I haven’t really felt ARC envy.. These days I’m way too busy playing catch-up on books published the previous year! I think a post like this would definitely have helped give me some perspective when I started out a year ago so it’s great that you’re discussing a topic like this!

    Like

    • Me too, I spent lots of my time as a new book blogger looking up ways to get ARCs too.
      It’s okay when they start to overwhelm us that we start to lose that envy, right? I’m exactly the same, I find that I’m far behind everyone else on the latest releases and even further behind on most blacklisted books. That’s where my focus is right now!
      Thank you, I’m glad you think so! You started your blog a year ago too?! High five!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I feel like I may be the minority, but the idea of ARCs scare me. I’m such a moody reader, and the thought of HAVING to read and review something stresses me out. Maybe someday I’ll feel differently, but as of now I have zero interest in ARCs. I guess you could say I have the opposite problem as ARC envy, lol.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think you’re definitely in the minority but I take my stand with you as well! After a few of my encounters with ARCs, the stress has left me to turn my gaze away from them.
      That’s good! Keep being that way, haha!

      Like

  23. Man, the never ending case of ARC envy. Personally, I feel a bit left out whenever I see people sharing and gushing about their stack of ARCs. It certainly doesn’t help that your Twitter feed is full of it too, so no matter how much I try to ignore it or tell myself it’s not worth it, there is that one minute of my life that makes me wonder what I have to do to receive that copy.
    I think these three points you mentioned are true, Josie. Some people think ARCs equal free books, which is JUST WRONG. I fancy myself a thrifty bookworm, but I won’t go to that length, that’s almost as bad as pirating books on the internet. It doesn’t help the author nor the book sell copies and produce even more books in the future. It’s just…selfish, I should say?
    Also, one thing I realized (just last night, really, since I saw those tweets about The Winner’s Kiss ARCs) was the admiration for these bloggers who worked hard on their blogs and gained their followers over the years do deserved these review copies. I mean, who else would be in the best place to read fast and create a discussion about a book before its release? Whose review do you read before going out and picking up that book? Most of the time, it’s one of them. 🙂
    So yeah, let’s junk this ARC envy and put our energy somewhere else, hehe!

    Liked by 4 people

    • I love everything you just said! When it comes to books on anticipating, I get a slight sadness that I’m not also holding an ARC of it like everyone else.
      Personally I love buying books – I’m just a poor little bookworm at the moment, but I always choose to buy the books in the end.
      Yes, selfish is exactly the right word!
      You’re so right. The people who receive ARCs work so hard to create everything that they have – their audience, their connections and EVERYTHING.
      Let’s put our energy is things much more productive! Yay!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Gyaaah I’m broke as well XD it doesn’t help that 2016 is looking like a wonderful time for books! haha maybe we can do something and shift the focus from ARCs to those books that were released long ago and easier/cheaper to buy? I’m sure there are tons more we haven’t read that demands our attention 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  24. I will admit to getting a little jealous when people get to read books that I want to read too way before the release date, which is 1.) because they get to experience it earlier and 2.) because I live in Austria and sometimes books get released (even though they are still in English, I am not talking about translated versions) months or even up to a year later than in other areas of the world. However, despite what I just mentioned, I am never bitter, angry or sad because of it. Like 99% of the time, the blogger or BookTuber really deserves getting the arc. They’ve requested it and got accepted and that makes me really happy for them.
    I like reviewing books and I am not always able to spend as much money on books as I would like to, so would I be happy receiving arcs? OF COURSE. But, I have never requested anything other than than an eArc on NetGalley and I have not actively approached any publishers, so I can’t expect to receive one out of the blue. I have a lot of respect for other bloggers and am happy for everyone’s success, so I guess in the end I am jealous when someone gets to read a book I want ahead of everyone else, but I am not all broken up or desperate because of it.
    Great post, Josie! And such a wonderful topic to discuss! I hope my rambling made sense 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think it’s totally natural to feel slightly jealous at first when someone gets an ARC of a book you are really dying to read. But it’s true, usually they deserve it and they have done all the hard work to get to the point on being eligible to receive it.
      And I admire those people who constantly get ARCs and review them because they have dedication to do it all the time! I’m not sure if I could.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That is another reason why I haven’t requested physical arcs yet – the dedication that is necessary to review all of those books is crazy. Sometimes life gets in the way, but you are definitely supposed to review those books in a timely manner. I sometimes don’t know how they do it!

        Liked by 1 person

      • It definitely takes quite a lot of dedication. That’s why I’d be slightly afraid if I was one of those people that publishers sent ARCs to my doorstep surprisingly, like some booktubers and such. I’d buckle under the pressure to read and review them!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I am not sure I could handle that either. I am out of school, so my main concern would be fitting it in with work, which also isn’t easy. I admire all the people who can actually do all that much reading in so little time.

        Liked by 1 person

  25. Oh my gosh I agree with this so much! I don’t have a lot of experience when it comes to requesting for ARCs until a few days ago and I had to tell myself that it’s not the end of the world if I don’t get approved for an ARC because the book will be released within a few months anyway! Great discussion! I love this.

    Liked by 2 people

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