LET’S DISCUSS THE LATEST BOOKTUBE EXPLOSION

This morning, as I was spending my daily time on Twitter, I was slapped in the face with the latest conflict in the book community, defined by the popular hashtag: #fakereadergirls. 

A man and booktuber by the name of Steve Donoghue recently put up a video titled “Last Week in BookTube!”Now, this is similar to the kinds of things we do as bloggers or booktubers: we give a wrap up of the week, spotlight certain bloggers/tubers who have shared some great stuff about books (sort of like my Spotlight Saturday posts!). Steve opened up by criticising book conventions such as BEA and the popular book bloggers who have shared all their vlogs and videos of their experience there. From there, he went on to criticise the booktubers themselves, pointing out many things about the amount fo viewers they have, that they don’t have the same love for books as ‘normal’ readers do, referring to their expensive and professional editing and much more. 

Fellow book lovers and booktubers responded, taking offence to the claims he made. Which is perfectly understandable in my opinion. Many of his claims were fairly inaccurate, such as his claims of popular booktubers not being real readers or lovers of books and instead, only doing it for the consumerist, commodity purposes.

But there leaves hanging the question of where #fakereadergirls came from. Simply, Twitter blew up with this after Steve made a comment under his video, again criticising booktubers who film professional videos with ‘fancy lights’ and ‘wearing blush’ as being fake readers. This was taken as sexism and female book lovers all over Twitter began to speak out against his comment. And so came the flood of makeup + book pictures and tweets. 

After investigating the argument, scrolling through endless tweets going against Steve and also from watching his video, I understand why people reacted so badly. He was clearly in the wrong and made some very hurtful comments to many booktubers who put time and effort into what we present based on their love for books. But let’s explore this issue because there are many sides to this and specifically in terms of Steve’s “sexist” comment, there may have been some form of miscommunication – possibly. 

#FAKEREADERGIRLS

Let’s talk about this wave of feminism that has sparked from Steve’s comment on YouTube. Many female book lovers were offended by the idea that he was hinting: that girls who wear or like makeup can’t be true lovers and readers of books. Quite frankly, I’d be outraged too – in fact, after learning more about the conflict on Twitter, I posted my own post on Instagram, explaining how I, as a lover of makeup, am more than capable of being an intelligent and book-loving person. There are arguments claiming that Steve did not refer specifically to women, and indeed in his comment, he makes no reference to any gender specifically. While he refers to booktubers sitting in front of their cameras and lights, “wearing blush”, there is no reference to women. 

But can you really blame us for not taking it as a personal attack to us as female readers? It’s the girls who dominantly wear makeup and wear blush, so in saying something as specific as that is going to invoke some sort of sexist theme behind it. Some people on Twitter have claimed that this reaction by the public is a miscommunication of what Steve has said. And maybe it was – maybe he didn’t intend to target and criticise female readers in particular. But we are responsible for the things we say and he is responsible for indirectly making a potentially sexist comment. After all, why would he explicitly add “wearing blush” into it if he was referring to booktubers as a whole? Miscommunication? Misguided intent? Possibly. But Steve, mate, you are still responsible for the things you say. 

WAS IT RIGHT TO HANDLE IT THIS WAY?

Do I agree with how Steve’s comment and video have been handled by the book community? I think it’s fair. We live in an age of the Internet, where everyone has the free choice to share their opinions. Just as Steve shared his opinion, the book community has the right to say something back. Surrounding the conflict, there was this idea of mob mentality that came from the mass reaction of the book community. The book community’s handling of this situation, in my opinion should not be considered as mob mentality. As a book community, we are a group of people who come together, drawn together based on the same passion and love for books. That’s what a community is. As one community, we speak up and we debate against things that may be hurtful or offensive to fellow members of our community. 

One thing I may disagree on is attacking and criticising Steve as being sexist. This is because of that miscommunication that could possibly have occurred through his comment. It’s easy for us to associate “wearing blush” with women, because naturally, women are definitely the ones who wear the most blush – I mean, I wear blush! I posted an Instagram photo, joining in with the #fakereadergirls. But I did this not to criticise Steve, but to criticise the idea that was potentially delivered through what he said: the patriarchal ideology that women can’t have brains and beauty. Our society today has largely moved past this, but, as it seems – not completely. Think of the TV show Beauty and the Geek: how are the women portrayed there? (From what I remember, they were beautiful but dumb). I made my post because I hate the idea that we are defined as being one or the other: smart or beautiful. Because, why can’t we be both?!

WHAT WE SHOULD REALLY BE FOCUSING ON

There was so much focus on Steve’s ‘sexist’ comment that it seems to have drowned out what we should’ve collectively been arguing against. Steve’s main and biggest point in the video was that popular booktubers are not the real readers – they use their fancy cameras and lighting to speak to thousands of their fans/viewers to not share their love for books, but instead advertise them as commodities. He points out that these booktubers have moved away from what really matters which is the love for books. 

This is what we should be criticising. Just because the quality of their videos is better, seems more staged and because they have more viewers, does not mean they love books any less. Sure, these booktubers are popular and are given books by publishers and authors to read and to promote. But this is due to the professionalism they show, the dedication they have in creating videos with great quality. I constantly desire to have a blog that is professional, looks amazing. I want my bookstagram to look fabulous (and I’m still yearning for a really great camera or the equipment to take great quality photos, sigh). Publishers and authors look for this professionalism and they notice it. Just because these booktubers are associating with the book industry does not mean that they are no longer doing what they do for their love of books. Their ‘fancy lights’ and ‘fancy editing’ are all a show of how much they want to commit to what they are passionate about. 

I wouldn’t spend hundreds of dollars on a new keyboard if I wasn’t passionate about playing piano. I wouldn’t splurge and spend $100+ of books in one go if I didn’t love them so much. I wouldn’t spend money purchasing a blog domain if I wasn’t sure of how serious I wanted to share my passion for books to the world. 

We are a book community. Whether we are more popular or less popular, no matter how many followers we have or whether publishers send us books or not, we are all here for one main reason: to share our love for books.


HELLO MY LOVELY FELLOW BOOKWORMS! IT HAS BEEN A WHILE. I’M SO SORRY FOR BEING SO ABSENT ON THE BLOGOSPHERE, UNIVERISTY IS STILL SO HECTIC, BUT NOW THAT I AM REACHING THE LAST WEEK OF THE SEMESTER, I AM EXCITED TO ONCE AGAIN IGNITE THE BLOGGING PASSION AND ALSO THE READING PASSION THAT I MAY HAVE LOST IN THE BUSYNESS OF STUDYING. 
I HOPE YOU ALL STILL REMEMBER ME AND STILL FOLLOW AND SUPPORT ME, I’LL BE SHARING LOTS OF EXCITING NEW POSTS SOON TO COME!  

42 thoughts on “LET’S DISCUSS THE LATEST BOOKTUBE EXPLOSION

  1. I just saw a video of a Booktuber talking about book bloggers vs. bookTubers. I was like what is happening? and she was talking about how book bloggers talk about bookTubers on social media and saying bad things about them, something like that. Now I’ve realized how there is a gap or between the members of this community. I wanted to be a part of it. But I don’t anyone to judge me for being myself or doing what I love. And I think there is something wrong with all these people who are saying awful or hurtful things to others.

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  2. Ha! So this really happened. I so missed this. Anyway, I just wanted to say your post was nicely put and enjoyed reading it. You put across ideas and information succinctly. 🙂 Lastly, to all book lovers out there. We are both, you know. Lover of books and blush. I am. Have a nice day!

    Liked by 1 person

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  4. I had completely missed all of this (then again I have barely been active in the community) but this is just awful. It sounds like he’s jealous of booktubers who make professional videos. Like you said, they’re spending a lot of time/money on doing something they love. They love making videos and especially about books. Why would so many booktubers read books and pretend that they love them?! That’s ridiculous? I mean those that make really professional videos are so talented they don’t HAVE to talk about books, they can make other types of videos too. Ugh. And the ‘wear blush’ comment is just… Great post Josie! Very on point 🙂

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  5. I really think he was just wanting to sensationalise his opinion. And it worked. He doesn’t know these big name Booktubers but has based everything on assumptions. They all had to start somewhere and even though they’re super popular now, it would have been a hard slog when they first begun too. I see it as no different from how a traditional blogger chooses their words, or how a Bookstagrammer uses props to set up a photo that is visually pleasing. With Booktubing, their face is their brand and there’s nothing wrong with wanting to look your best and feel confident. I don’t see it as a sexist remark but just a middle aged man who still sees the ‘bookworm’ stereotype as being nerdy, unattractive and a plain Jane librarian type. You’re proof that we’re not gorgeous girl ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • You make a really good point there! I guess we all have different perceptions of what those who love books are like. He possibly just has a more traditional, conservative and possibly stereotypical? view of a book lover.
      Thank you, Kelly! 😀 ❤

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  6. For a while, I wasn’t quite sure what the #fakereadergirls thing was, but after doing my own research I was quite appalled by his comments. Personally, I don’t wear makeup, but I think it’s horrible to claim that girls cannot wear makeup AND like reading. I think if he had been referring to the aesthetics of Booktube, that would be quite different – because Booktubers do put a lot of effort into making their videos look good (as they should), but commenting on their makeup is quite different.

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  9. I saw this whole fake reader girls thing on Twitter and it just seemed completely ridiculous and a swipe at all females who read (or who like wearing makeup) tbh. I’ve seen these sexist opinions a lot in the gaming world to be honest but some people just have nothing else to say so they just take the low blow. It’s so ridiculous and thank you to you for speaking out Josie!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I think a topic such as this one can easily get out of hand and handled in the wrong manner. You’re right, some people have nothing better to do than make these comments and such.
      Thank you, Jeann!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. First of all, I missed seeing your posts so much Josie!
    Secondly, thank you for writing such an important discussion. I loved this hashtag and all the attention it got in the past few days. Although Steve’s original statement might have been misinterpreted, I think the goal of the hashtag, which is to empower girls from all walks of life – is a valuable one. I also didn’t like his original intent, which was to liken booktubers to publicist hacks simply because of their number of followers? Having a large following does not automatically mean you’re insincere or less worthy! I think that as we all work in public space to some capacity, it’s fine if people want to present the best of themselves – I certainly strive to!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Aw, Aentee! I missed writing posts so much. I still feel kind of inactive, but I’m trying to get more active 😄
      Yes I definitely agree. It’s one of the reasons I participated in the hashtag – because I felt empowered by doing it!
      Exactly. I admire those who have worked so hard to create such professional, high quality content, and I still see many (like you) who are still so genuinely passionate about books!
      Thanks for taking the time to read, Aentee! 💓

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  11. I missed this so thank you for bringing it up and discussing it. Even though he didn’t actually use the word ‘women’ in his reference to blush, I too assumed based on how we are the larger demographic to wear and purchase it. I hate how there’s this debate that beauty and brains must be separate, in order to enjoy a book and be a reader must I look or act a certain way? Whilst I understand this isn’t his main argument I think he should of formulated his argument better where he didn’t bring down a group of people to get his point across. From the argument that these booktubers are missing the point of reading or comments on their equipment I actually find this rather funny, are Hollywood actors missing the point or less of an actor or film enjoyer than an indie actor? Because they have bigger budgets or ‘better quality’?

    The booktubers I watch may have good quality videos but their excitement and love for reading is evident, the ones I follow also regularly post reactions or little skits about certain series, their love for reading is why they spend money on equipment.

    I haven’t watched his video, so if I’m totally off with my thoughts I apologise! 🙂
    Also hope uni is going well, I’m looking forward to you being able to blog more!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re very welcome, it’s good that I could get you back in the loop with these events in the book community. I know, I hate it too. They’re two different things, it’s as ridiculous as saying that if someone likes a certain type of food, they can’t be a reader or something. Ridiculous! But it’s all surrounding stereotypes and stereotypes are hard to get rid of, I guess.

      That’s a very good point! There might be another unimplied debate of that people with better quality stuff are better actors/creators/YouTubers – I don’t believe this to be so! So in the same way, people who have fancier equipment can’t be any less real readers than someone else who doesn’t share the same!

      You’re pretty on point with your thoughts, don’t worry! 😀
      Thank you, I really appreciate it. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Bravo. You are one of the few people that were able to express their opinion in a respectful and sane manner. Personally, I was disappointed in the reaction from many Booktubers and members of the community. There were so many hateful and out of line comments on that video that I just couldn’t continue reacting to the situation. I completely disagree with the notion that woman who wear makeup are not readers. One thing has nothing to do with the other. Misogyny is something that should be called out but in a respectful and critical manner. Writing hateful comments and attacks solves nothing.

    Thank your for giving your opinion on the matter. I feel like I should also contribute to the discussion. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Kirstie!
      You’re very right. There is a certain way that we can react, and reacting back with hate is just not going to help any situation at all. It should be open for peaceful debate rather than attack and defence.
      Thank you for also sharing your thoughts, it’s wonderful that we can all discuss this in depth! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I hadn’t heard of this but I’m shocked that someone would say such ridiculous things. I think booktubers who are willing to learn how to edit and put so much time into sharing their love of books should be applauded, not criticized. Also, I agree with you that if they’re spending so much on lighting and materials to improve their videos, it shows that they really care about vlogging about books, as surely they wouldn’t spend all that money if their heart wasn’t set on it?! And I think it’s very silly that he made comments about how a girl can’t love makeup and books – this is 2016, like you said, why can’t girls be pretty and smart?! Wonderful post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yep, I think so too. It shows how much love and effort they pour into it! And the sexist thing is a very wobbly conversation as he didn’t particularly say it was ‘girls’ who were fake, but people ‘sitting in front of their fancy lighting and wearing blush’. Who’s wearing blush? We’re not too sure except the dominant idea that it’s girls who wear blush. But still, he could’ve said something other than referring to make up.
      Thank you!

      Like

  14. I’m so glad you added that last part! Why I’m totally for and agree with the hashtag fakereadergirls and the motivation for girls to stand up for themselves, I think the biggest issue this guy has is that he thinks good quality videos is a screen to disguise bad content which is untrue! Taking the time to make a video that can be well seen and looks professional does not mean that the content falters. And what does that say about all the fans of the booktubers, me being one of them? That were easily distracted by good editing and lightning and don’t notice when the content is bad, I don’t think so! That’s my biggest problem in this debate. Maybe he was being sexist maybe not, but he did insinuate that some book fans are stupid or easily manipulated by well done videos and that is not okay

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ah, yes Sara thank you for sharing! I really like your point that it affects us as fans of booktubers. It’s not just offensive to the creators of content, but the ones consuming it (which is us). If we are fans of these booktubers who are supposedly ‘fake readers’, what does that say about us? I really like that point you make Sara, thank you for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. PREACH SISTA. I actually agree with everything. Like, I don’t even have to get upset or spend any energy on this issue because a) Twitter killed him so bye Steve and b) He’s just…ignorant. So I mean I feel like instead of attacking him maybe try to calming explain, ya feel? Get a little Jesus mojo in there. And also laugh at him because WOW was what he said embarrassing. (Okay. I’m not very good at the Jesus mojo thing.)

    And yeah…I don’t entirely get the sexist thing. I mean it was subtly sexist…I guess…but I think we blew that out of proportion. I think sexism is definitely not the main issue in what he said because it’s just barely implied.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Haha, oh gosh Becca, you bring a smile to my face! Yeah, I’m not dwelling on the topic because there’s enough people involved in it already. I just wanted to explore the entire thing in different perspectives, you know? 😀
      HA, Jesus mojo 😛 It’s a hard thing to do.
      I agree, the sexist thing was probably a bit overblown and not handled in the bets way, as some booktubers have pointed out.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Ohhh THIS MAKES SENSE NOW!! I’ve been seeing the hashtag on twitter and stuff but I didn’t know what sparked it. So I really appreciate this post, Josephine!! *showers you with cake*
    SO YES. I agree: of course you can be interested in beauty AND books. It’s really rather horrible for anyone to think otherwise. And I do think that if someone makes sexist comments like that, then it’s okay to call them out. I’m never in favour of attacking though. Ugh. That’s not nice. But that guy clearly had a problem and it probably stemmed from jealous tbh. I feel like it’s awful but big blogs or booktubes or just ANYTHING always get a lot of hate because of smaller jealous accounts. 😦 And it’s silly to criticise people for wanting to come across as professional. What’s wrong with that?!?! Eeeesh. It’s awesome that someone is so passionate about books and booktubing that they’d buy a good camera and learn about good lighting and things. THAT SHOULD BE APPLAUDED. *nods*
    Super interesting discussion!! I LIKE.

    Liked by 1 person

    • YAY, CAKE. Thank you, Cait! It’s definitely okay to call people out for saying potentially offensive and ostracising comments. Attacking is horrible, though, yes and I think people thought the book community were ‘attacking’ or having a sense of ‘mob mentality’ towards him but I don’t think this was the case.
      I know right? I think we all kind of strive for that sense of professionalism, right?
      YES, INDEED! Praise to them for spending their own hard earned money for that!
      Woo, I’m glad you enjoyed it!

      Like

  17. I heard about this yesterday and I was honestly quite shocked. I wasn’t even really inclined to watch his full video based on some of the comments I read by him and then decided otherwise to have a full picture. I found almost everything he said really offensive, but I am really glad about your post and that you analysed everything. I agree that it isn’t just about the sexist comments but also about him accusing booktubers to not be “real readers”. I mean, what is that even supposed to mean? They love books and they read them, that makes them readers just like everyone else.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for appreciating my post! I really felt like it was important to analyse the entire situation because sides and different perspectives needed to be heard. Overall, what he said was quite offensive, I feel sorry for those people he targeted – intentionally or not – by his comments.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I’m not really in twitter and instagram (I only use them for personal purpose) so I definitely missed this. I get where Steve get his idea (or opinion) but the way he said it is just wrong. I don’t understand why all of sudden he attacks other booktubers. Those people that have “nicer” equipment and editing has been around for awhile, and it also means they put extra effort (not that I bash people that doesn’t do edits or whatsoever). Why would you buy expensive equipments, books, waste your time to film and edit the video if you don’t love reading and sharing it to the world?? Also, the reasons why those booktubers have a lot of subcribers is probably because they video looked more professional. And it’s 2016, I thought make up is such a normal thing to wear everyday so why does it have to be a big deal if those booktubers wear make up? There are a lot of people I know in real life that really likes make up, chick flicks, and also love to read. Maybe he doesn’t meant his “opinion” to be taken that way, but I guess since it’s booktube, he should be more careful with the way he says it because it reached everyone in and out this community! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • It is very hard to know whether he intended his opinion to be taken that way or not, because we all interpret things differently but he did indeed word his opinion in a way that clearly hinted at offensive points. When on a platform like YouTube you need to be really careful of what you say – in fact, anywhere on the Internet you need to be very selective of the words you use!
      Thank you for sharing your thoughts 🙂

      Like

  19. Thank you Josie, with the time difference this whole thing just happened while I was sleeping, ahah, and I wondered exactly what had happened. So thank you for sharing this! I have to say, if everyone’s entitled to their opinion, Steve definitely didn’t share it the best way… Moreover, some people are exclusively booktubers, so why would it be wrong for them to have the necessary equipment for it?
    I missed you Josie! I hope uni is going okay, and that you’re having a great, wonderful time. I can’t wait for more blog posts 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • You’re more than welcome, Marie!
      There were better ways he could’ve shared his opinion, I agree. It’s a crazy point to make, right? If I were to move into booktube, I’d be purchasing all the things that will make the best quality videos as possible.
      I missed you too, and I missed being here! I’m enjoying it, despite the stress and rush to finish assignments. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I guess it’s because I’m barely active on Twitter but I totally missed this, so thank you for sharing, Josie! Instead of the suggested sexism, I, too, also noticed Steve’s comment about how these blogger/vloggers with bigger followings to “not be real readers.” Of course, he’s free to have his own opinions but I think his approach definitely wasn’t the best (especially since he’s targeting specific groups and making assumptions “by watching their videos carefully”), sigh. Not exactly related to Steve or #fakereadergirls, but I find it interesting that the book blogosphere is generally more supportive compared to more video media based platforms like booktube. I mean I know a lot of people that love booktube, but because it reaches out towards such a big audience, there sometimes seems to be so much more room for criticism (and trolls) as well. :/

    Liked by 2 people

    • You’re welcome! I’m glad I could get you in the loop with what’s happening around the blogosphere. If I didn’t go on Twitter this morning, I would’ve missed it too.
      Yes, he definitely has a right to say what he thinks, but he does need to be careful of how he says it.
      That’s an interesting thought! I agree with that, though. The blogosphere is extremely supportive and caring as opposed to the things that happen on booktube. I think it’s because there can be such a huge difference in the quality of videos on Youtube and it kind of puts people into a hierarchy of some sorts, you know? But on the blogosphere, it’s pretty much all equal here.
      But then again, there should be no reason why booktube can’t be as supportive as the blogosphere is.
      The big audience is an important point too, you’re right!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Well I saw the booktubers reacting but I didn’t to what. Now I know. I totally agree with you. Wearing make up doesn’t mean you’re not smart and that you doesn’t like books as much as you should. To me these are two totally different things ! And about the fancy equipment, I don’t get why he can think that. They’re spending a lot of time editing and are coming with new ideas. They’re really professional, I don’t think that have a job next to booktube so yeah it’s mandatory for them to have a fancy light or a fancy camera !

    Liked by 2 people

    • Exactly, they are completely different from one another! It’s crazy to think that liking both would mean that one of them is not a genuine interest.
      The fancy equipment is like a testament to their commitment to what they do, indeed!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. This is a throwaway comment, and I’m not endorsing what Steve said, but I’ve worn make-up before upon doing videos and photoshoots — it really does make a difference.

    And while he’s entitled to his opinions, what’s most unsettling to me watching this video is his random laughter throughout and his nods to certain people. AM I THE ONLY ONE CREEPED OUT?

    Liked by 2 people

  23. when I first saw this hashtag I thought of the ‘fake fan’ thing that people like to throw around in their fandoms. the term fake fan really pisses me off, along with the ‘I’m a bigger fan’ sh*t (sorry about my language) I could go on and on about how I hate this idea of someone being a bigger fan or someone being a fake fan just because of how long they’ve liked something or if they own items relating to the fandom, because not everyone can afford to buy merchandise, thousands of books etc
    originally I was going to make a YouTube channel to talk about books because I am a lot better at verbally explaining my feelings on not just books but everything in general, however I decided against this for two reasons 1) I’m a perfectionist and I can’t afford a decent camera or have the time to edit to the standard that I would be happy publishing and 2) as I’m not very good at expressing my feelings through writing it’d be good for me (mostly for english and general life) to get practice and to get better at learning to write how I feel.
    I love watching BookTube videos and reading blog posts, I have never seen one as better than the other it’s just a way to express your opinion online which is what we all are aiming to do. Some people prefer blogging and some people prefer making videos, both take time and effort and both express your opinion.
    On the point that Steve has made about BookTubers and their ‘fancy lights’ and ‘fancy editing’ and ‘hiding’ behind all of that. Personally I understand if people want to look good and or their videos to look good as it’s not just their words that are being seen in this video, their entire face and some of their surrounding are being seen in a video and I feel like we shouldn’t judge people because they want to look nice to have their videos look nice, just like how all of us Bloggers check our grammar in our posts and make our blog theme look nice. I personally think Booktubers feel as if they have to make sure they look ‘presentable’ as we live in a society that is judgmental and will ignore videos/blog posts if it doesn’t look appealing, I know not all people act this way but sadly a lot of people do.
    – Yasmin

    Liked by 2 people

    • I agree with what you’re saying here. No one in the blogosphere or the YouTube sphere is any more or less powerful or bigger than one another. We all have different ways of doing things and we all have differing lifestyles.
      Definitely, booktubers present themselves through the aesthetics of their videos, in the same way that we bloggers express and present ourselves through our blog design and images, etc. It’s no different and our motives and level of interest/love for something shouldn’t be determined by that!

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts, Yasmin.

      Liked by 1 person

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